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EEF 2019 | 15th EEF – European Ecological Federation Congress

Long-term ecological monitoring on islands

Speakers

Paulo A. V. Borges | cE3c- Azorean Biodiversity Group, Univ Azores

Rosalina Gabriel | cE3c- Azorean Biodiversity Group, Univ Azores

 

Abstract

Presently, it is widely recognized that there is an ongoing “biodiversity crisis”, which means that ecosystems and species are not coping with the current drivers of local and global environmental changes. Habitat loss in islands has occurred through direct activity of humans, such as clearing of vegetation for wood/fuel, development including housing, industrial and infrastructure; and the intensity of these impacts is dependent on population density. Furthermore, the intentional and accidental introduction of non-native invasive species has led to habitat and microhabitat degradation throughout the islands. This has eventually led to severe habitat fragmentation bringing the problems of edge effects and the genetic isolation of species, particularly to those species with specific habitat requirements or poor dispersal ability. Knowing changes in species abundance and distribution (i.e. range-size contraction and expansion) is crucial for halting biodiversity loss on islands. Obtaining long-term key information on the distribution and abundance of island native species is of paramount importance, but extremely challenging, especially for invertebrates.

In this Symposium we will discuss the implementation of long-term coordinated survey and monitoring of native island biota.

 

Short Presentations

Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS): a proposal for the long-term coordinated survey and monitoring of native island forest spiders and beetles
Paulo A. V. Borges

Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS): a proposal for the long-term coordinated survey and monitoring of native island forest bryophytes
Rosalina Gabriel

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